All posts filed under “Childhood

Her spirits were always at high-water mark, her tongue always going – singing, laughing, and plaguing everybody who would not do the same.

Nelly describes Cathy

Her spirits were always at high-water mark, her tongue always going – singing, laughing, and plaguing everybody who would not do the same. p.54

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Having knocked gently, young Linton entered, his face brilliant with delight at the unexpected summon she had received. Doubtless Catherine marked the difference between her friends, as one came in and the other went out.

Linton arrives and Heathcliff leaves

Having knocked gently, young Linton entered, his face brilliant with delight at the unexpected summon she had received. Doubtless Catherine marked the difference between her friends, as one came in and the other went out.  p.90

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I saw the quarrel had merely effected a closer intimacy—had broken the outworks of youthful timidity, and enabled them to forsake the disguise of friendship, and confess themselves lovers.

Cathy and Edgar grow closer

I saw the quarrel had merely effected a closer intimacy—had broken the outworks of youthful timidity, and enabled them to forsake the disguise of friendship, and confess themselves lovers. p.94

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I’ve no doubt he has completely forgotten all about Ellen Dean, and that he was ever more than all the world to her and she to him!

Nelly says goodbye to Hareton

I kissed Hareton, said good-by; and since then he has been a stranger: and it’s very queer to think it, but I’ve no doubt he has completely forgotten all about Ellen Dean, and that he was ever more than all the world to her and […]

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He retreated out of arm’s length, and picked up a large flint. ‘I am come to see thy father, Hareton,’ I added, guessing from the action that Nelly, if she lived in his memory at all, was not recognised as one with me.

Hareton does not recognise Nelly

He retreated out of arm’s length, and picked up a large flint. ‘I am come to see thy father, Hareton,’ I added, guessing from the action that Nelly, if she lived in his memory at all, was not recognised as one with me. p.141

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